Labrador Retriever Growth Height and Weight Chart

Labrador Retrievers are a popular breed of dog, and many people are interested in knowing how much they will grow, their height and weight, and how long they will live. This blog post will provide a Labrador Retriever growth chart to help you better understand your dog’s development. We will also discuss some of the common health concerns associated with the breed and provide tips for keeping your Labrador Retriever healthy and happy!

Lab Growth Chart By Month

Below you will find a Labrador Retriever growth chart by month. This will give you an idea of how big your Lab will be at each stage of their life.

Age (months)Male Weight (lbs)Male HeightFemale Weight (lbs)Female Height
322-2612-15”20-2610-14”
533-4915-18”35-4912-15”
751-5916-19”40-5515-18”
957-6820-23”48-6220-22”
1162-7522-25”53-6621-23”
1364-7722-25”55-6821-23”
1564-7722-25”55-7021-23”

Lab Growth Chart Male

Male Labrador Retrievers are bigger than females on average. They will weigh between 55 and 80 pounds when fully grown, and they will stand 21 to 24 inches tall at the shoulder.

Age (months)Weight (lbs)Height
322-2612-15”
533-4915-18”
751-5916-19”
957-6820-23”
1162-7522-25”
1364-7722-25”
1564-7722-25”

Lab Growth Chart Female

Female Labrador Retrievers are smaller than males on average. They will weigh between 55 and 70 pounds when fully grown, and they will stand 20 to 22 inches tall. Below is a growth chart for female Labs.

Age (months)Weight (lbs)Height
320-2610-14”
535-4912-15”
740-5515-18”
948-6220-22”
1153-6621-23”
1355-6821-23”
1555-7021-23”

Lab Weight Chart

Below you will find a Labrador Retriever weight chart. This will help you determine if your Lab is at a healthy weight.

Age (months)Male Weight (lbs)Female Weight (lbs)
322-2620-26
533-4935-49
751-5940-55
957-6848-62
1162-7553-66
1364-7755-68
1564-7755-70

Lab Height Chart By Age

Below is a Labrador Retriever height chart by age. This will give you an idea of how tall your Lab will be at each stage of their life.

Age (months)Male HeightFemale Height
312-15”10-14”
515-18”12-15”
716-19”15-18”
920-23”20-22”
1122-25”21-23”
1322-25”21-23”
1522-25”21-23”

How Long Do Labrador Retrievers Usually Live?

Labrador Retrievers have a lifespan of 12 to 13 years. However, some Labs have been known to live 15 years or more! Here are some tips for ensuring your Lab lives a long and healthy life:

  • Provide your Labrador Retriever with high-quality food that is designed for their specific age, weight, and activity level.
  • Exercise your Lab regularly. This will help them stay fit and healthy, and it will also help them to avoid boredom and destructive behaviors.
  • Take your Labrador Retriever to the vet for regular checkups and vaccinations. This will help to catch any health problems early on and ensure that your dog stays healthy.
  • Spay or neuter your Labrador Retriever. This will help to prevent health problems later in life, such as cancer.
  • Be prepared for the cost of owning a Labrador Retriever. They are a high-maintenance breed, and their food, vet bills, and other expenses can add up quickly!

What Are The Most Common Diseases That Labrador Retrievers Suffer From?

Labrador Retrievers are prone to a number of health problems, including hip and elbow dysplasia, obesity, diabetes, and cancer. Fortunately, many of these diseases can be prevented with proper care. For example, exercise and weight control can help to prevent obesity in Labs, and regular vet checkups can help to catch health problems early on.

Let us explore these common diseases in more detail below:

Hip and Elbow Dysplasia

Hip and elbow dysplasia are common problems in Labrador Retrievers. Dysplasia is a condition where the bone does not fit properly into the joint, and this can cause pain, lameness, and arthritis. Hip dysplasia is more common in Labradors than elbow dysplasia, but both conditions can be painful and debilitating.

Obesity

Obesity is a common problem in Labrador Retrievers, and it can lead to a number of health problems, including joint pain, diabetes, and heart disease. If your Lab is overweight, talk to your vet about a weight-loss plan. Exercise and proper diet are key to helping your dog lose weight safely.

Diabetes

Another common health problem in Labrador Retrievers is diabetes. This is a condition where the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, and it can lead to weight loss, increased thirst and urination, and lethargy. If you think your Lab may have diabetes, take them to the vet for a checkup.

Cancer

Labrador Retrievers are also at risk for cancer. This is a serious disease that can be fatal, but it is important to remember that not all cancers are the same. Some types of cancer are more treatable than others, so it is important to get a diagnosis from your vet as soon as possible.

If you want to avoid these common health problems in your Labrador Retriever, it is important to take them for regular checkups, exercise them regularly, and feed them a high-quality diet. By taking these steps, you can help to ensure that your Lab lives a long and happy life.

FAQs

How much do Labradors grow after 6 months?

After 6 months, Labradors will have reached about 50% of their full adult size.

At what age do Labradors reach their full height?

Labradors typically reach their full height by 18 months of age.

Is my Lab fully grown at 8 months?

No, a Lab is not yet fully grown at eight months old. They will continue to grow and fill out until they are about two to three years old.

How can you tell if a Lab is going to be big?

There is no sure way to tell if a Lab is going to be big, but there are some general things to look for. For example, Labs from working lines tend to be larger than those from show lines. Additionally, male Labs are typically larger than females. If you are concerned about your Lab’s size, talk to your vet.

Final Thoughts

The Labrador Retriever growth, height, and weight chart above will help you to predict how big your Lab will get. However, it is important to remember that every dog is different and will grow at its own pace. If you have any concerns about your Lab’s growth, talk to your vet.

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by Nicole Barnett

Nicole has been a freelance writer for over 10 years. She has three dogs, two of which she rescued from the streets. When not furiously typing away at her computer, you’d either find her chasing after her adorable dogs and kids, or volunteering at a local shelter.

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