How To Leash Train A Dog That Pulls? A Useful Guide For Dog Owners Everywhere

Dogs that pull on their leash can be a huge headache for their owners. Not only is it difficult to walk them in this way, but it can also be dangerous. Therefore, leash training is necessary.

Why Do Dogs Pull On Their Leashes?

There are various reasons why dogs pull on their leash. Let us explore them below:

They are excited and want to get where they’re going

One of the main reasons dogs pull on their leash is because they are excited and want to get where they’re going. This is usually the case with puppies who are full of energy.

They want to sniff everything

Another reason dogs pull on their leash is that they want to stop and sniff everything. For dogs, smelling things is a way of exploring their environment and getting information about other animals.

They are trying to escape something

Sometimes, dogs pull on their leash because they are trying to escape something. This could be another dog or person that they don’t like, or it could be something that scares them.

They want to assert their independence

Dogs are independent creatures, and sometimes they pull on their leash because they want to assert their independence. They may not want to listen to you or do what you’re asking them to do. If this is the case, leash training is absolutely necessary.

Whatever the reason, leash training your dog can be a frustrating experience. But there are some things you can do to make it easier for both of you. Let us find out how you can properly leash train your dog.

how to leash train a dog that pulls - dog walking with leash

How Do I Properly Leash Train My Dog?

Here are some tips on how to leash train a dog that pulls:

Step 1: Start with the basics

Before you start leash training, make sure that your dog knows all of the basic commands like sit, stay, come, and down. If your dog doesn’t know these commands yet, then leash training will be much harder.

If you need help with basic commands, you can always enroll your dog in an obedience class or hire a professional dog trainer.

Step 2: Get the right equipment

The leash and collar you use are important for leash training. You’ll want to use a leash that is comfortable for you to hold and is the proper length. For most dogs, a six-foot leash is a good length. You’ll also want to make sure that the collar fits properly.

If you’re not sure what type of leash or collar to get, you can always ask your veterinarian or a professional dog trainer for advice.

Step 3: Choose the right time and place to start leash training

You’ll want to leash train your dog in an area with few distractions. This way, your dog can focus on you and the task at hand. The leash training session should be short so as not to overwhelm your dog.

Step 4: Put the leash on your dog and make him get used to it

The next step is to put the leash on your dog and let him get used to it. You’ll want to do this for a few minutes each day. Let your dog walk around with the leash on, but don’t try to pull him along or give him any commands just yet.

Step 5: Start walking with your dog

Now that your dog is used to the leash, it’s time to start walking with him. Again, keep the leash slack and let your dog lead the way. If he starts to pull ahead, simply stop and wait for him to come back to you. Once he does, continue on your way.

Step 6: Add some commands

Once your dog is used to walking on a leash, you can start adding in some commands. “Sit,” “stay,” and “heel” are all good commands to start with. As always, keep the leash slack, and be sure to praise your dog when he does what you ask.

Step 7: Keep up the training

Leash training is an ongoing process. Therefore, you need to keep up the training even after your dog seems to have mastered it. Every so often, take your dog for a walk without a leash to make sure he still knows how to behave.

If you follow these steps, leash training your dog will be a breeze! Just remember to be patient and consistent, and soon you and your furry friend will no longer have to worry about him pulling on the leash.

What Are The Dangers Of Leash Pulling In Dogs?

There are several dangers that leash pulling can pose to both you and your dog. Let us explore them below:

Choking

One of the most common dangers of leash pulling is that it can cause your dog to choke. This is because when your dog pulls on the leash, it puts pressure on his neck and windpipe. If he continues to do this, it could lead to serious health problems or even death.

Injuries

Another danger of leash pulling is that it can cause injuries to both you and your dog. For example, if your dog is pulling on the leash and you try to hold him back, he could end up yanking you off balance and causing you to fall.

Or, if your dog is running ahead of you and pulls on the leash, he could trip you up and cause you to fall. Therefore, you should always be careful when leash training your dog, and make sure that you are using the proper leash and collar for his size and strength.

Increased aggression

Dogs that pull on their leashes may also become aggressive since they are constantly being restrained. This is especially true if the dog is not leash trained properly and does not understand why he is being restrained. Therefore, it is important to leash train your dog properly from an early age so that he does not develop any aggression issues.

FAQs

Why does my dog pull so hard on the leash?

There could be a number of reasons why your dog is pulling so hard on the leash. It could be that he is trying to get to something in front of him, or he may simply be excited and want to go faster. Whatever the reason, it is important to leash train your dog so that he learns how to walk calmly on a leash.

How do I stop my dog from leash pulling in 5 minutes?

There is no magic answer to this question, as each dog is different and will leash pull for different reasons. However, there are a few things you can try that may help to stop your dog from leash pulling. First, try walking with your dog in short bursts so that he doesn’t get too excited. Also, make sure to praise him when he walks calmly on the leash and give him treats as a reward. Finally, if your dog is still leash pulling, you may need to invest in a no-pull harness or head collar.

How do you train a big dog to walk on a leash without pulling?

The same leash training techniques that work for small dogs also work for big dogs. However, you may need to put more effort into leash training a big dog, as they have more energy and are often stronger than small dogs. Additionally, it’s important to be consistent with your leash training, as big dogs can be stubborn and may take longer to train.

How do I stop my stubborn dog from pulling?

There are a few things you can do to stop your stubborn dog from pulling. First, make sure that you are using the correct leash training techniques. If your dog is still leash pulling, you may need to invest in a no-pull harness or head collar. Additionally, be consistent with your leash training, and don’t give up if your dog doesn’t seem to be improving. Finally, make sure to provide your dog with plenty of exercises, as this can help reduce leash pulling behavior.

What is the best leash to stop a dog from pulling?

There is no one leash that is guaranteed to stop a dog from pulling. However, some leashes may be better suited for leash training than others. For example, a leash with a gentle leader or no-pull harness attached may help to reduce leash pulling behavior.

Is it OK to let your dog walk in front of you?

No, it is not advisable to let your dog walk in front of you, as this can encourage leash pulling behavior. Instead, try to keep your dog at your side or behind you when walking on a leash.

how to leash train a dog that pulls - dog with leash

Final Thoughts

So, how do I leash train a dog that pulls? There is no definitive answer to this question. However, some leash training tips that may help include using a leash with a gentle leader or no-pull harness attached, keeping your dog at your side or behind you when walking on a leash, and being consistent with your leash training commands. Eventually, with patience and positive reinforcement, most dogs can be leash trained to walk calmly by your side.

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by Nicole Barnett

Nicole has been a freelance writer for over 10 years. She has three dogs, two of which she rescued from the streets. When not furiously typing away at her computer, you’d either find her chasing after her adorable dogs and kids, or volunteering at a local shelter.

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