How To Deshed A Dog?

One of the most taxing responsibilities of dog owners is to handle unwanted fur all over the house. It can get on your furniture, clothes, appliances, and all over the floor. This can get even worse during the summer because that is shedding season for dogs.

Shedding is not only a hassle for you but your dog as well. It can be very uncomfortable and itchy, and this might even leave hairless spots on your dogs which are prone to skin irritations and complications.

De-shedding is one of the options you can perform to help your dog and it is also a necessary part of maintaining a healthy grooming routine for your dog.

Want to learn more? Stick around as we determine how to deshed a dog.

Why Should We Deshed Our Dog?

Shedding is a natural process for dogs and should be part of the grooming regimen we do for them. It will help in preventing matting in your dog’s undercoat, too much matting in your dog will grow to be heavy and a hotspot for dirt and parasites. So, de-shedding will keep our dog’s skin and coat healthy.

For dog owners, we can benefit from regular de-shedding to avoid a ton of fur on our house, from our furniture, appliances, to our clothes. De-shedding will be a necessity for us to maintain a clean environment.

This will also allow you to be familiar with your pet’s coat and skin. If ever there are any differences in their skin or coat, you can easily identify them and consult with a vet for a professional evaluation.

How To Deshed Your Dog

Maintain A Cleaning Routine

One of the most effective things you can do to deshed your dog is to maintain a cleaning routine for your dog. You will only need a few grooming types of equipment for dogs such as an undercoat rake, slicker dog brush, high-velocity blow dryer, and a de-shedding shampoo.

You can start by bathing your dog using the de-shedding shampoo. Dry them with a high-velocity blow dryer which can effectively dry them off and at the same time blow off any loose hair. Then finally brush off their loose hair with the de-shedding brush tools. You can still brush them regularly to prevent matting and take off loose fur since dogs only need to take a bath at most two times a month.

Take Them To A Professional Groomer

If you are unfamiliar with the de-shedding process or you don’t have the right equipment for it, you can take your dog to a pet groomer regularly. Professional groomers have all the bathing equipment and de-shedding tools such as a high-velocity dryer, de-shedding brush and rake, and fur trimmers. 

The groomer can also help with identifying any irritations on your dog’s skin and coat. If there are any, contact your vet for a professional evaluation.

FAQs About How To Deshed A Dog

How Do Groomers Deshed A Dog?

Professional groomers deshed a dog using de-shedding tools such as de-shedding shampoo and conditioner, brushes, rakes, a high-velocity blow dryer, and clippers to trim your dog’s hair. The whole process will only take about an hour and would only cost between $20 to $40 per appointment.

How Often Should You Deshed A Dog?

You should deshed your dog regularly as part of their grooming routine. Your dog is only required to take a bath once or twice a month, so you can only use the de-shedding shampoo and conditioner then. You can, however, brush your dog’s coat every day to remove loose hair and to prevent matting in their coat.

What Is The Best Tool To Deshed A Dog?

The best tool to deshed a dog is by using a de-shedding dog brush. This brush can remove any loose hair on your dog’s top and undercoat, while at the same time untangling any mats. You can also use dog de-shedding shampoo and conditioner, along with a high-velocity dryer.

How Long Should You Deshed Your Dog?

If you plan on de-shedding your dog at home, each grooming session should take about 10-20 minutes, more if it is during the warmer seasons where shedding is the worst. This 20-minute process should include bathing them, drying them off, brushing off loose hair, and untangling any matting.

How Do I Get The Undercoat Off My Dog?

It would take de-shedding tools to remove your dog’s undercoat. Using a de-shedding dog rake will efficiently remove your dog’s undercoat any other loose hair in the way, as well as untangle any matting. Using a de-shedding shampoo and conditioner will also help in removing your dog’s undercoat.

How Do You Deshed A Dog’s Undercoat?

You can de-shed a dog’s undercoat by using de-shedding tools such as de-shedding brushes, rakes, shampoo, and conditioner. These tools are designed to reach down to your dog’s undercoat to remove loose hair and untangle any matting. De-shedding blades are also a good option to cut through matting and trim your dog’s coat.

Do Dogs Feel Better After De-shedding?

Dogs will feel better after de-shedding. Loose hair and its undercoat can be very uncomfortable, and there are instances where you might remove so much loose hair from brushing that all the loose hair would weigh a few pounds! Your dog would appreciate your help through the shedding process.

Does Brushing A Dog Reduce Shedding?

Brushing a dog can reduce shedding since it helps in maintaining a strong and healthy coat for your dog. To do this, you must maintain a regular grooming regimen for your dog to reduce shedding. You can do this at least once a week.

What Is An Undercoat Rake For Dogs?

An undercoat rake for dogs is specifically designed with metal bristles that reach down to your dog’s undercoat and remove loose hair while also untangling any matting. Undercoat rakes do not mess up your dog’s topcoat. You should only use this before or during your dog’s bath.

Conclusion 

Maintaining a grooming regimen for your dog will not only benefit you by preventing unwanted fur all over your house, but it will also keep your dog’s skin and coat clean and healthy. You can perform home remedies, or you can bring your dog to a professional groomer regularly.

Learn more about the what’s and how’s about your dog at Doggos Daily, where we provide you with all the information that you’ll need.

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by Nicole Barnett

Nicole has been a freelance writer for over 10 years. She has three dogs, two of which she rescued from the streets. When not furiously typing away at her computer, you’d either find her chasing after her adorable dogs and kids, or volunteering at a local shelter.

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